What the World Would be like if NaNoWriMo Didn’t Exist

Bookish (and not so Bookish) Thoughts, hosted by Bookishly Boisterous, is a chance for book bloggers to dabble in areas besides books (but those are welcome too). This month I plan on talking about my month of NaNoWriMo or what it’s like to write a book in 30 days.


I am bringing you another portent.com created title enhanced by the facts, figures, and other information provided in the report on NaNoWriMo2018 (NaNoWriMo.org). At this point in the month, I couldn’t find a better reminder of why we are doing this to ourselves!

CUTE KITTENS!!!!

1. The world would be black, white, and gray without cute kittens (even gray ones)

NaNoWriMo shows writers the limitless possibilities of writing. If you have ever read The Giver by Lois Lowry, then you know the dystopian world is black, white, and gray because it lacks individuality, passion, and imagination. A writer’s world is full of these attributes, so I imagine a world without NaNoWriMo would look like the world in The Giver.

2. The world would have less romance

A romance with words, not people – 2,921,032,466 (total written by participants last year) words to be exact. That is a lot of romance. So forget about the time you are losing with that special person and enjoy, for this one month at least, the love you have for the story you are creating.

3. The world wouldn’t embrace insanity

What else do you call the belief that not only can you write a novel but that you can do it in 30 days? Last year, writers’ logged in 35,410 (fifty-thousand word) drafts. That’s insane! And writers who are participating in NaNoWriMo are feeling a bit crazy trying to reach the 50,000 words about now. But we are loved and admired, i.e. embraced, for our insanity.

4. The world would be full of loneliness and despair

NaNoWriMo participants are the best cheerleaders and support community. Writing is typically an isolating profession. Still, when you participate in NaNoWriMo, you are part of a community that is 293,396 members strong. Members who are happy to do word sprints with you, meet you in cafes and libraries for a write-in, and send you words of encouragement. It’s a fantastic community!

5. The world would be less magical

Writing is magical – you can leap tall buildings in a single bound, visit faraway places, and experience things you wouldn’t ordinarily be able to experience – all by taking what is in your imagination and finding the words to explain it in print so that others can experience it too. Total and pure magic!


This has been a good week. I feel like I am seeing the forest through the trees and optimistic about my story going forward. I really like Scrivener, too. I can see where editing won’t be such a daunting task this year and who knows, I may actually send my novel to a publisher with my fingers crossed ☺️ I have written 37,570/50,000 words!!!!

How is everyone else faring so far?

6 thoughts on “What the World Would be like if NaNoWriMo Didn’t Exist”

  1. The first thought that popped in my head when I read the title –

    “OH NO THEN Night Circus WOULDN’T EXIST EITHER!! AHHHHHHH!! STOP ITTT!!” 🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣

    BUT OH MY GOD I LOVED THIS POST SOOO MUCHHH!! 😭😭😭😍😍😍 It brightened my day and made me feel heck of a lot more positive about writing! ❤️❤️

    And you have made quite a progress, Tessa! WELL DONEEEEE!! YAYYYYYY!! ❤️❤️😍😍🦋

    A VERYYY CUTTTEEE AND FLUFFY POST AS ALWAYSSSS, Tessa! ❤️❤️

  2. That’s almost 3 billion words last year (I had to read the number 3 times – it just seems so ridiculously amazing). All good reasons to participate, and it is quite cool how blogs slow down to a crawl as we’re all busily scribbling away. I frequently complain about NaNo pressure, but it sure does get me motivated. Congrats on 35k words. One more week, Theresa. You rock.

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