Mini Fantasy Reviews | Children of D’Hara books 2 & 3 by Terry Goodkind and other not-to-be-missed fantasy novels

The Children of D’Hara by Terry Goodkind

Book 2, Hateful Things

Only magic protects D’Hara from the Golden Goddess and her kind, the magic of Richard Rahl and Kahlan Amnell, the magic that the Mother Confessor carries within her womb. To take this world, the Goddess must ensure Richard and Kahlan’s children are never born. In the dark shadows of the People’s Palace the predators are gathering, watching, learning, feeding…

⭐️⭐️⭐️ In the first novella of the series, Kahlan finds out a bit of life-changing news, and by the end of this novella, Richard also becomes aware of how high the stakes are for defeating the new enemy that threatens to exterminate the world of D’Hara. I always enjoy everything that Goodkind writes, especially stories of D’Hara, but this novella series arc is not as satisfying, so far, like a big fat juicy novel. It reminds me of the difference between a tv soap opera and an epic film. They both have their place, but they are basically as hard to compare as apples and oranges. I’m trying to hold out judging until I have gotten through the whole series. I may even read them a second time back to back once all of them have been published.

Book 3, Wasteland

Richard Rahl and Kahlan Amnell are fighting on all fronts. The Golden Goddess, Collector of Worlds, has infiltrated the People’s Palace, able to insinuate herself into the minds of those without the gift of magic. Richard can trust no-one but the gifted. So, when Vika, one of his sworn Mord-Sith bodyguards is abducted, he has to get her back. His determination will lead him and Kahlan deep into the labyrinthine heart of the People’s Palace – the Wasteland – and into more danger than they have ever faced before.

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ What fans of the Sword of Truth series know, and love has returned! This installment of The Children of D’Hara has it all – action, magic, mystery, and peril. Whereas episode 2 spun its wheels without doing much to advance the plot, episode 3 takes us further into the People’s Palace and the magic used to create it. When a mystery man was discovered deep in the wasteland of the palace, many other events begin to make sense and anticipation for how the story will end blossoms. Though the suspense at the end of each chapter grows tiresome and is unnecessary, the addition of a few new characters is welcome. All-in-all, I am thrilled with how the story is progressing and the possibilities of where it will go.

Episode 4 is scheduled to release on January 6, 2020, and the last episode (5) on March 2, 2020.


Dark Justice: The Last Ward by Shelley Russell Nolan

Five hundred years ago, the cure for the common cold went horribly wrong, turning those infected into freaks consumed with hate and rage. Forced underground, the freaks return above ground at night, driven to attack the surface dwellers – their bite infecting thousands more. To fight the freaks and protect mankind from extinction, scientists created genetically enhanced soldiers. Stronger, faster, with enhanced senses, wardens are trained from birth to protect the weaker humans. The Captain of the Ward, Jackson Kyle, is infected while saving the life of another warden. Due to his genetic enhancements, he is like no other freak. His faculties intact, he escapes from the Ward and encounters a mysterious young woman. The second he touches her, he is caught in a bond, compelled to protect her at all costs. For she will decide the fate of humankind.

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ Dark Justice is an original SFF story based on the timeless theme of the power of love. With well-developed characters and an equally well-developed plot, the plight of the human condition is resounding and intense. Almost to the very end, you will wonder which way Justice will go, as the humans in this story are not sympathetic characters at all. The only things that I wish for the story are that the world-building had been more developed and that the character of Miranda had been a touch less overwritten at times. But these did not detract from the complexity of the plot, the fast pace, or the believability of the other characters. I loved the originality of the story and the” half breed” characters who showed intelligence and courage when all looks hopeless. A must-read for SFF fans!!!


The Vine Witch by Luanne G. Smith

For centuries, the vineyards at Château Renard have depended on the talent of their vine witches, whose spells help create the world-renowned wine of the Chanceaux Valley. Then the skill of divining harvests fell into ruin when sorcière Elena Boureanu was blindsided by a curse. Now, after breaking the spell that confined her to the shallows of a marshland and weakened her magic, Elena is struggling to return to her former life. And the vineyard she was destined to inherit is now in the possession of a handsome stranger.Vigneron Jean-Paul Martel naively favors science over superstition, and he certainly doesn’t endorse the locals’ belief in witches. But Elena knows a hex when she sees one, and the vineyard is covered in them. To stay on and help the vines recover, she’ll have to hide her true identity, along with her plans for revenge against whoever stole seven winters of her life. And she won’t rest until she can defy the evil powers that are still a threat to herself, Jean-Paul, and the ancient vine-witch legacy in the rolling hills of the Chanceaux Valley.

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ The Vine Witch is a story surprising in its simplicity, thrilling in its action, and just a good-ole fun story. In the early 1900s, witches who focused on a trade were the norm. This story focuses on Elena, who is a witch that specializes in helping wine grapes grow to perfection. Through the course of the story, she is cursed, framed for murder, and on the run as she races to save her new-found love and her grape farm. The plot is impressive, and the pace is excellent, but I wish that the characters and their relationships with one another had been developed more fully. You never really care about any of them, and the story, instead of just good, would be great with this one element addressed.


Spell Driver by Gina LaManna

With a wedding on the horizon, and her father tucked safely away in prison, the future is looking bright for Lily Locke. Unfortunately, life on The Isle is never calm for long… and when a Ranger is killed brutally in plain sight, Lily and her fiancé—the renowned Ranger X—find themselves hunting a murderer more ruthless than any they’ve ever encountered before.

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ Spell Driver is the sixth book in the Magic and Mixology mystery series and is available on Kindle Unlimited.

This is a cozy mystery series that mixes hocus pocus with crime-solving in a smart, witty, and slapstick manner. The writing is spot on with a well-developed fantasy world (a magical island invisible to humans) and complex, endearing characters. It is fast-paced and manages to keep even the most distracted person (me) focused on the story. This is one of my all-time favorite series! I would recommend starting from Book 1, Hex on the Beach.

9 thoughts on “Mini Fantasy Reviews | Children of D’Hara books 2 & 3 by Terry Goodkind and other not-to-be-missed fantasy novels”

    1. There are some good reads there for sure! And it has been interesting to read Terry Goodkind in a novella series. I was curious how it would work out. I think once it’s complete, I will oohh and aahh over it.

    1. Determination but I’m coming out of a week long reading break now. Reading while at Disney is nearly impossible 🙂

  1. A few of these resonated with me, but I really liked the sound of Spell Driver. I’ve never heard of this series before. I’m going to have to look it up. It sounds like fun!

    1. I stumbled on the series because it is part of kindle unlimited and fell in love with it instantly. It is just so fun.

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