How will the world end?

Sci-Fi/Fantasy Book Review | Wanderers by Chuck Wendig

Del Rey Publishers ▪️ July 2, 2019 ▪️ 800 pages

In Bookstores Today!

Dear reader,

Wanderers takes the reader on an thrilling journey of self-discovery. An epic apocalyptic sci-fi novel that rings true in a disturbingly fantastical manner, the story follows two sisters – Shana and Nessie — as they discover love and loss — and calls into question the readers’ beliefs on theology, politics, technology, and environmental issues.

What I liked:

It is easy to suspend disbelief. Within the story, there are many references to different aspects of pop culture, such as video games and books by other authors that were similar in topic. Such a seemingly small thing, but one that made it almost impossible for the reader to not feel the connection and to believe the stories plausibility.

The novel encompasses many of the major theories of what will cause humankind’s demise.  Even though the story takes on so many different theoretical beliefs on the demise of humankind, in the end, it all comes together to make perfect sense.  This is precisely what makes the novel epic.

Each character is unique in voice and beliefs. Whether a major or minor character, each is complex, distinct, and fully developed. It would be easy in a novel such as this to make the characters more of a caricature rather than believable and much like people you have met in your life journey. But they are credible, and that makes the story that much more complex.

The mostly chronological timeline. Many novels in this genre tend to switch up the timeframe until the reader is unsure of what’s going on. At no point are you uncertain of where you are in the timeline as the novel is predominately chronological.

What I wish:

That I had more time to savor the nuances.  Eight hundred pages may be off-putting to some readers, but you should not let it stop you from reading this book as it’s worth the time invested.  I only wish I had more time to notice and appreciate the more subtle aspects of the story.

The minor characters are easier to remember when they popped in and out of the story.  I had no problem remembering the names of the main characters, but the minor characters were a problem for me.  It could have been because, when you added in the minor characters, there is a large cast of characters.  Or it could be because after being gone for a bit, the minor characters weren’t subtly reintroduced.

To read or not to read:

You will be missing out on a story that will leave you awed if you don’t pick up this book.  It includes so many different genres that it is appealing to many different readers.  Chuck Wendig’s novel Wanderers is a compelling, thought-provoking story that will make you question your own opinions of many issues in the world today.

Thanks to Del Ray Publishers and NetGalley for my advanced copy given with the expectation of receiving an honest review.

Available online from these retailers:

Amazon 

Barnes and Noble

Books A Million

Indie Book Stores

Target

Apple Books (must get through the App)

4 Comments

  1. I’ve been keeping my eye on this book and looking out for reviews. I want to read it because I like this author but seeing a 5* review is very encouraging.
    Lynn 😀

  2. It does sound very intriguing, especially the blend of genres. I remember spending a week a few summers ago reading The Terror by Dan Simmons. 900+ pages but somehow it wasn’t daunting. It had a wonderful mash-up of genres as well, sometimes horrific, other times lyrical. I admire any author who can hold me spellbound for that length of pages. It sounds like Wanderers would do the job too.
    Great review. And I love the starkness of that cover!

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